Cordless Drills And Cordless Power Tools For Craftsmen And Do It Yourself Home improvers Updated on December 31, 2016

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The Cordless Drill.

Can there be any doubt the cordless drill has revolutionized the job of any skilled laborer or craftsmen? Literally, for some skilled tradesmen the cordless drill has knocked off hours from each and every day for him or her, and made them far more productive than they once were within the hours they did work.

Of course electric drills have been around for a fair amount of time, however, the cordless drill provides mobility far beyond the plug into the wall socket electric drills, and greater safety besides. With a cordless drill, the peril of a nicked electrical cord, or getting the cord tangled in something or another are gone, and besides, rolling out and rolling back up long extension cords can be very tedious – especially for jobs when the drill is needed, but the greater power provided by one hundred and twenty volts isn’t so necessary.

So far as drills go, they aren’t going anywhere – according to Wikipedia humanity has been using some sort of something or another to drill holes for various purposes for at least thirty five hundred years, and I suspect that, in fact, using some sort of tool or rock or something to drill a hole has been with humanity as a constant bit of working or building of various and sundry things for far longer still.
What Are The Uses Of A Cordless Drill?

Not to bore anyone to tears, but the truth of the matter is that most often in my two major lines of skilled labor or work, the cordless drill isn’t used so much for the drilling of holes as it is for the fastening or unfastening of things to or from a solid surface. In other words, cordless drills get used a lot as cordless screwdrivers, or cordless nut-drivers.

Especially in the HVAC industry, everything is fastened together with either quarter inch hex head screws, or five sixteenths inch hex head screws, but because these screws can often be very very tight or rather rusted and old, the power of the cordless drill is very much needed in many cases, as this prevents the use of a pair of channel lock pliers in conjunction with a nut-driver tool.

This Fall and Winter, I’m working as an electrician, and the electrician is more one to be screwing fixtures together with traditional Philips head or flat head screws, or even actually drilling holes into things to insert a screw, as the situation might call for.

It doesn’t much matter if you use a cordless drill in your mode of employment or not, in this day and age of things forever being fastened together by screws of various and sundry shapes and sizes, it is practically an essential tool to have on hand at the homestead, whether you be male, female, old or young. Practical applications within the home or on a job involving a cordless drill are for all intents and practical purposes more than anyone could ever get around to naming or listing.
A Pre Battery Powered Cordless Drill.
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The History Of Cordless Drills.

According to Wikipedia cordless drills have been in the use of humankind for at least thirty five hundred years. I suspect that number is nowhere near big enough, as the history of the world is far far vaster and greater than it is presented to us dumbed down Americans in our corporation controlled indoctrination books.

Please keep in mind that what a cordless drill could look like or be made from greatly surpass the sort of thing one generally has flash in their mind when the term cordless drill, comes to pass through there.

The Wikipedia article on drills mentions the Harappans and Egyptians, but obviously what is shown above as a hand powered and very cordless drill is not what we’re truly concerning ourselves with here, as of course, we’re talking about battery powered cordless drills in the modern homestead and the modern workforce. What is shown below is also very much NOT the things used by cultures from the distant past.

I’m told via this link here, that for all intents and practical purposes the technology behind what now constitutes the battery powered cordless drill originated with the German corporation known as Bosch. Despite all that, the biggest three names in cordless drills, from my own experience, seem to be those of DeWalt, Makita, and Milwaukee.

The reality is that while most craftsmen I know use either a DeWalt or a Milwaukee cordless drill, some of the older guys refer to all cordless drills of any brand as “Makitas.”
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Makita DF010DSE 7.2-Volt Lithium-Ion Cordless Driver-Drill Kit with Auto-Stop Clutch
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Makita Cordless Drills

The Makita cordless drill company has been around since 1915 when it was established in Japan, in 1970 they established a US subsidiary, and their stock is actively traded publicly all over the world. Makita has established itself firmly in the power tools market and as I’d stated before, some people, older craftsmen and contractors, will simply refer to a cordless drill as a “Makita.”

Sadly for the value of the product and the consumer too, the year 1993 saw the Makita corporation setting up factories in China, but of course that matters not too much to someone simply looking for a cordless drill.

Makita is still “Japan’s largest manufacturer of power tools,” despite them not being made in Japan much anymore. Of course we see how multi national corporations work. Makita makes a huge array of power tools for all industries, but the general opinion I am hearing out in the field and on the job is that their products do not stand as firmly in the minds of craftsmen here in the USA as do those by either DeWalt or Milwaukee.

Now one shouldn’t think that the three brands I’m going to discuss here are the only ones out there making good cordless drills, that would be very far from the reality, and in fact, these three brands I am going to discuss are very recognizable, and very desired by all the local thieves wherever you live.

So far as myself and the work that I do, no single drill will truly suffice for the simple reason that the larger 18 volt drills are too big to carry in a tool pouch all day, they’ll roll out of the thing, fall, and get damaged. Often times if I’m simply opening up a condenser or hanging a light fixture, then the smaller 7.2 volt drill will more than suffice, and those CAN typically be fitted into a tool bag or tool pouch safely without fear of the thing falling out.

The big 18 volt drills, of course, have more settings and more capability, and when the drilling of holes through dense metals is the job, then those are certainly the drills to have.